troika | Troika

Castanet: Troika Wants To Build More Than 300 Homes In McCurdy Road Hills

Posted by | News | No Comments

KIRK PENTON

Article first appeared on CASTANET on August 28, 2020

Troika Management Corporation has submitted its plans for a major residential development on McCurdy Road that could also have a major impact on the city’s transportation system.

Terreno Hillside Community would consist of 266 condominiums and 43 townhomes if it were to come to fruition. Troika submitted rezoning and official community plan amendments to Kelowna city council earlier this month.

The development, which would be weaved into the hillside north of Highway 97, would also include the extension of McCurdy Road to connect to Mt. Baldy Drive. According to Troika, that has been identified by city staff as a key component of the city’s master transportation plan and would help ease traffic congestion on Highway 97 by providing an alternate route to Dilworth and Glenmore.

Terreno Hillside Community would feature 309 homes with one, two or three bedrooms.

“Our current development plans make a tremendous effort to minimize the impact to the environment by dedicating majority of the property to parkland,” Troika development vice-president Rich Threlfell wrote in his company’s submission letter to city council. “It also leaves open space for hiking trails and outlines a Mill Creek restoration and protection plan.

“We have made extensive consideration for the steep slopes and hillside scaring by creating architecture that protects the surrounding nature and complements the surrounding developments. The architecture is both modern and simple, providing an aesthetic that seamlessly blends into the surroundings.

“Troika has taken extensive care to ensure we utilize the development nodes to eliminate a development sprawl.”

Spotlighting the Aboriginal Westbank First Nation with Chief Roxanne Lindley

Posted by | News | No Comments

Today immediately following National Aboriginal Day we here at Troika wanted to do a post showcasing the local Aboriginal community. The Westbank First Nation was first recognized in 1963 and the community became self-governing in 2005. The properties we develop at West Harbour aren’t actually ours; they’re the property of the Westbank First Nation, which is part of the Sylix Nation.

We at Troika and West Harbour are grateful to the Westbank First Nation for leasing us the land upon which we build and being a partner throughout. So today on National Aboriginal Day Troika is proud to honor the history, present, and future of the Westbank First Nation. We appreciate the generosity of the Westbank First Nation in allowing us to sit down with Westbank Chief Roxanne Lindley. In our time together, she spoke powerfully and authentically about the Westbank First Nation Band’s challenges, solutions, progress, and what we can do as developers to ensure a satisfying outcome for all.

west bank first nation chief roxanne lindley

Credit to David French

Challenges

When we sat down with Chief Lindley, we started by discussing some of the challenges her band faces. She was deeply concerned about the impact of drugs and crime on her community.  Although the land is urbanizing, she believed in the need for her band to preserve the values and heritage that had been passed down.

“But I think us being so urbanized, I would look at and say that brings a bit of a difficulty because when you want to do language and cultural lessons and you want to do community stuff it’s really difficult to compete with Orchard Park Mall and the theatres and the shops and stuff like that. So I think with us… The city provides so many wonderful things. But there’s also things that large cities provide that aren’t so wonderful like the drugs, the gangs, etc. Especially our youngers ones… Going over, taking the bus over and having such close access to some unhealthy things.”

Solutions

Chief Lindley was upbeat and optimistic about the possibility of overcoming those obstacles through outreach and collaboration. She laid out for us a vision of continuing to collaborate with the city, the RCMP, and neighbouring bands to combat these issues and reach out to at-risk individuals through counselling and activities.

“The chiefs will be meeting first week of July and we’re looking at having a very difficult discussion about drugs and the impact of drugs and working with RCMP and bringing together all of these organizations to ensure that we have safe communities.”

“We’re worried if we have a drug problem, we need counsellors, we need male and female counsellors, we need outreach workers. So we’ve gone through some of those discussions and we have the staff in place to take care of all of those social needs. We’ve recently opened our youth centre. It’s a 8 million dollar building we’ve got staff in there we’ve got young people in there, and the idea is to capture them, take them in, embrace them, and give them activities that will give them strength, will give them guidance, will give them clarity for what’s to come down the road. We will be opening a skateboard park right besides the youth centre. So there’s been a lot of activities that the past council and this council have undertaken where the focus is really about community and community development and I’m very proud of that.”

Progress

During our time with her, Chief Lindley also took time to reflect about where we’ve been, and the progress we’ve made. She highlighted the area of education in particular as a major point of emphasis and progress over the course of her time with the Westbank First Nation, working on Aboriginal issues.  Additionally, she wanted to raise awareness of how open to collaboration the Westbank First Nation is.

“What I really like people to know is this council really believes in partnerships. We believe in collaboration, we believe in going forward together, we believe in giving our kids the best of the best.”

“For example, in our community schools, we’re going through renovations, we’re going through additions, and we want to increase the size of our community schools so we can have more classrooms, more grades, more language, more cultural activity. So education for us and I believe I could say that for this whole council is really quite critical and ensuring that we have partnerships. When I was young and in school we had nobody there to be a liasion between myself and my parents and the school. That was like a long time ago, but where we are now, we have advocates, we’ve gotten an Aboriginal Education Committee where we sit together as First Nations people, we sit together as politicians, and we talk about what can we do that’s best for our children.”

“Look I know that Westbank is often seen as being very progressive which we are, we’ve got one of the best self-government agreements in the country, we’re very proud of that, so now it’s time to look at, focus on, and nurture our children and their education and support.“

What can we do

To conclude our Aboriginal Day piece, when asked about how we as developers can honour the Westbank First Nation when we develop, Chief Lindley again echoes the need for collaboration at each stage of the building process, citing the Bridge Hill as an example.

“We have people that can come in and deal with some of those really extreme sensitive issues that could perhaps delay development or delay projects such as unearthing our ancestral remains. And we’ve seen that happen with Bridge Hill. When they were doing the bridge, had we not been there on site it would’ve been a very lengthy uncomfortable process but we have all of that infrastructure in place. And I would just like developers and real estate people, before you go in and alter the ground, think about the Heritage Conservation Act, think about the accountability, responsibility, and just remember that we’re here, and we would love to work with any developer or real estate person within our area of interest.”

For more information about the Westbank First Nation and their band, click here, and for more information about the larger Aboriginal Sylix Okanagan nation they’re a part of, click here. For more information about West Harbour and our development on their land, click here, for more information about us here at Troika, click here.

Troika CEO Renee Wasylyk

Renee Wasylyk in BC Business

Posted by | News | No Comments

Our CEO, Renee Wasylyk was recognized in the latest BC Business Leadership feature, issued this week. Renee tells her story and talks about how it has formed her leadership style.

“I didn’t want to be a developer who chased the market,” she says. “I wanted to be a community leader and builder who was here for the long term.”

Read the full article here.

screenshot of vancouver sun article of west harbour

West Harbour in the Vancouver Sun; Troika CEO Discusses

Posted by | News | No Comments

West Harbour in the Vancouver Sun

We are thrilled to have been featured in the Vancouver Sun Newspaper this weekend! In case you missed the story, Renee Wasylyk, our CEO, sat down with Michael Bernard to discuss West Harbour, one of Kelowna’s most successful lakeside communities.

Renee explained her thought process behind the 250-home low-rise village development in collaboration with the landowner and Chief Roxanne Lindley. Despite the broad demographic, the West Harbour residents are connected by their love of the outdoors. West Harbour certainly fosters a strong sense of community, and Renee also emphasized the relationship to the Westbank First Nation and Troika’s legacy fund, another main attraction to the development. West Harbour also offers many amenities, and additionally, the upcoming Harbour Club is highly anticipated. The third phase of the development will offer 16 duplexes and three different home models, starting at $590,000. Renee could not be happier with the continued success of the community!

Click Here to read the full article.

 

renee wasylyk one bag challenge kelowna mayor colin basran

Kelowna Mayor Colin Basran’s ‘One Bag Challenge’

Posted by | News | No Comments

Our very own Renee Wasylyk was nominated by Kelowna Mayor Colin Basran for the One Bag Challenge. Not familiar? Read about it and watch his original video here. The One Bag Challenge is a twist on the ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’, where Kelowna locals are challenged to bring a full bag of food to the Greater Okanagan Food Bank during the month of July, when their supplies are at their lowest. 

Renee graciously accepted, and nominated five more people. See who she nominated by watching the video here.

But the fun didn’t end there.

Within 24 hours, Renee received two more nominations: from Kelowna – Lake Country MLA, Norm Letnick, and Kelowna City Manager, Ron Matiussi.

She decided to take the One Bag Challenge to the next level. See what she did here.

In just 10 days, the Greater Okanagan food bank collected 24,000. Congratulations and thank you to everybody that participated!

Troika Kelowna developer Rich Threlfall

Troika Tribe: Kelowna Developer Welcomes New Partner [Press Release]

Posted by | News | No Comments

Rich Threlfall becomes partner at Troika Management Corp.

February 16, 2016 – Kelowna BC – Kelowna-based land and real estate development company, Troika Developments, announced today that engineer and Kelowna developer Rich Threlfall would be added to the list of partners, adding a new skillset to their already esteemed leadership team.

Threlfall’s breadth of knowledge and experience in sustainable civil engineering and land development has aided Troika in significant growth during his four year tenure as Development Project Manager for the company. “Rich started with Troika as a consultant a decade ago, but became a part of our Troika tribe four years ago” says Renee Wasylyk, Founder and CEO of Troika. “It soon became apparent that we didn’t see the future of Troika without his leadership and presence. Brad Klassen and I decided to bring on another partner for the first time in 10 years. Rich Threlfall is the next generation of Troika”.

Threlfall came to the Kelowna developer via CTQ Consultants Ltd., where he planned and designed communities, parks and public spaces for many local developers, institutions and municipalities, including Troika. Here he played an integral role in the conception and manifestation of Troika’s West Harbour, an extraordinary Tuscan-style waterfront community in West Kelowna. “Rich was instrumental in bringing about our last four successful projects. It was evident that he thought more like an entrepreneurial developer than an engineering consultant.” says Wasylyk. “He understands community.”

Troika Developements

A view of Troika’s West Harbour from above.

Having worked with the Troika Tribe in various capacities for nearly ten years, Threlfall admires their forward-thinking nature and commitment to community and their team.

“We are a team dedicated to having fun while building carefully planned and sustainable communities that enhance the daily life of our residents, and that is what sets Troika apart as a developer” Threlfall explained, “I am truly grateful for the opportunity to partner with Brad and Renee to develop and lead a team of passionate professionals, including our colleagues, consultants, contractors and partners.”

The new partnership announcement comes amidst a hiring blitz at Troika, having recently increased their workforce by approximately 10%, due to recent growth and strategic restructuring.

About Troika Management Corp.

Troika is a progressive, future-focused company that brings together designers, contractors, engineers and project managers in a team environment to plan and construct superior housing and commercial projects, while passionately working to maximize community benefit. The company’s projects adhere to the highest standards of sustainability and environmental practices. For more information visit TroikaDevelopments.com

About West Harbour

For more information visit WestHarbourKelowna.com

Media Contact

Calvin Lechner, Marketing & Communications, Troika Management Corp.

Phone: 250-869-4945 x212

E-mail: [email protected]

 

###